Agenda and draft minutes

Venue: MS Teams or Council House (TBC)

Contact: Jamie Sheldon  Email: jamie.sheldon@plymouth.gov.uk

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Items
No. Item

110.

Declarations of Interest

Cabinet Members will be asked to make any declarations of interest in respect of items on this agenda. 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

There were no declarations of interest made by Councillors, in accordance with the code of conduct.

111.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 167 KB

To sign and confirm as a correct record the minutes of the meeting held on 09 February 21.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Cabinet agreed that the minutes of the meeting held on 9 February 2021 are confirmed as a correct record.

112.

Questions from the Public

To receive questions from the public in accordance with the Constitution.

 

Questions, of no longer than 50 words, can be submitted to the Democratic Support Unit, Plymouth City Council, Ballard House, Plymouth, PL1 3BJ, or email to democraticsupport@plymouth.gov.uk. Any questions must be received at least five clear working days before the date of the meeting.

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The following four questions were submitted to Cabinet:

 

Question one submitted by Mr Gregg Black was answered by Councillor Pete Smith (Deputy Leader)

 

Question: In the first 2020 lockdown, local play parks, such as Lipson, were closed to the public. Why have they not been closed in this lockdown? I walked past Central Park play park by the life centre on Sunday 17th and there were about 70 families not social distancing and mixing.

 

Answer: Plymouth City Council’s response to play areas is in line with the national lockdown guidance implemented by the government on 4 January 2021, which was to keep play areas open. In line with this, we have also put signs up to ensure people are following social distancing guidelines.

 

The link to the government guidance is below:

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-managing-playgroundsand-outdoor-gyms/covid-19-guidance-for-managing-playgrounds-and-outdoor-gyms#keyprinciples-for-the-safe-usage-of-playgrounds-and-outdoor-gyms-during-covid-19

 

Question two submitted Mr James Knight was answered by Councillor Evans OBE (The Leader)

 

Question: The cost of the Gormley Statue has finally been revealed after many months of persons asking, why has the figure been released now, and are there any plans within the original funding to address the environment around the statue which is a mixture of concrete and flagstones?

 

Answer: The costs revealed in the Council report was the budget for the works in 2020/2021 and included a number of projects in that area including essential strengthening works to protect West Hoe Pier against damage from the sea.

The Council signed a legal agreement with Sir Antony that it would not disclose the cost of Look II. This is common practice with art commissions, because the price of one piece of work can influence the value of other work by the same artist. Artists would think twice about doing business with the Council or The Box if they knew that we broke our promises about confidentiality. The Council is committed to being open about how it spends public money, and this is one of very few exceptions to that rule. The independent Information Commissioner’s Office agreed in November 2020 that we have taken the right approach to this.

 

The total cost of the sculpture has not been revealed and there are currently no plans to address the environment around the sculpture.

 

Question three submitted by Mr Paul Gulley was answered by Councillor Sally Haydon, Cabinet Member for Customer Focus and Community Safety

 

Question: The City Council has issued a number of Fixed Penalty Notice for obstruction under the Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) Regulations 2020 in November 2020. Please advise how many FPN were issued and of those collected a percentage of those that have been paid in full?

 

Answer: During November Plymouth City Council has served two Fixed Penalty Notices for obstruction. Payment not received. Legal proceedings are pending.

 

 

 

 

113.

Chair's Urgent Business

To receive reports on business which, in the opinion of the Chair, should be brought forward for urgent consideration.

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

There were no items of Chair’s Urgent Business.

114.

Update from the Director of Public Health on COVID-19

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Ruth Harrell (Director of Public Health) provided an update on Covid-19 which included:

 

(a)

cases of Covid 19 had been reducing in Plymouth since the peak of the wave which was around 19 January 2021, the rates were now approximately 30 per 100,000 in a week which had fallen from 330 per 100,000 when cases were calculated in January; the England average was currently 60 per 100,000 and the South West average was 33 per 100,000;

 

(b)

there were significant reductions in those admitted to hospital; the highest rates of cases tended to be in the younger working age population as many were out and about providing essential services during lockdown;

 

(c)

high rates of Covid 19 cases were apparent in Keyham, however cases in the Royal Navy showed up as Plymouth cases and this could be misleading; if cases developed on a ship when they would be in an isolated environment and there would be no exposure to the Plymouth residents;

 

(d)

the country had just passed the first milestone in opening up after the lockdown passed on 8 March 2021 – the ease of restriction dates were dependent on the data even though the roadmap had been set out. Key elements that were important over the next few months including vaccination, testing and following guidance;

 

(e)

the vaccination rollout was saving lives; nationally there was a reduction in deaths and hospitalisation in the over 80s and there was confidence that benefits would continue in all age-groups as the rollout continued;

 

(f)

testing was still being undertaken to ascertain if the vaccination was positively affecting the transmission of Covid-19 – it was highlighted that it may reduce transmission but wouldn’t take the figure down to zero;

 

(g)

the vaccination programme in Plymouth was in full flow and approximately 40% of adults in Plymouth had received the first dose of the vaccine; 95% of older adults in Plymouth were expected to have received the vaccine;

 

(h)

a clinic was set up to vaccinate 260 homeless individuals; a community champions programme had been launched to ensure that accurate information on the vaccination was provided, to dispel myths and to try to enable people to attend vaccinations by reducing practical obstacles which may prevent from attending an appointment;

 

(i)

those that considered they were eligible for the covid vaccination however had not received a letter asking them to make an appointment were able to ring 119 or go to the NHS website to book an appointment;

 

(j)

lateral flow testing kits were available for people that didn’t show symptoms however would still be able to spread the disease; these were rapid tests and results could be provided within 20 minutes to an hour; the Council had started a programme to facilitate testing and a pilot scheme was being undertaken in select locations;

  

(k)

it was imperative that guidance was followed whilst restrictions were being eased.

 

Members noted the update and thanked Ruth for the way in which she led the  ...  view the full minutes text for item 114.

115.

Update from the Chief Executive on Reset/Response

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Tracey Lee (Chief Executive) provided an update on Covid-19 Reset/ Response which included the following:

 

(a)

she echoed the Cabinet’s thanks to Ruth Harrell for her work in leading the Covid-19 pandemic response and highlighted that Public Health had led the response for over a year since the Council had been in emergency planning arrangements. These arrangements were still in place and an internal strategic and tactical lead was already set up to link in with the Local Resilience Forum;

 

(b)

the vast majority of services were open and were operating as normal – there were a small number of services that had remained closed or restricted in line with Government restrictions; the Government’s roadmap had been published and the Council was planning for the re-opening of the city;

 

(c)

working with partners had been a real focus in the past twelve months and the Chief Executive offered her thanks to partners for their joined up approach in the response;

 

(d)

a priority for the council was the wellbeing of the workforce; there was continued recognition for the pressure that staff were under over the past 12 months and support services were in place if needed;

 

(e)

support services had been stood up, including community testing and Caring for Plymouth and support for those for people shielding or self isolating;

 

(f)

the Business Support Grant Scheme was a significant challenge in terms of administration, there were multiple schemes and a large amount of people involved in ensuring that the funding received from Government was going out as fast as possible;

 

(g)

thanks was offered to those supporting schools re-opening on Monday;

 

(h)

twenty applications had been received for the Community Champions project; this entailed working with people to get messages out about Covid-19, guidance and the rollout of the vaccine. Those wishing to volunteer were encouraged to contact the Council;

 

(i)

a virtual question and answer event relating to Covid-19 was scheduled for 13 April 2021 for residents of Plymouth; this was to be chaired by Tony Gravit from the Local Healthwatch – online registration was required;

 

(j)

plans for the elections were underway with objectives for them to be covid safe and conducted in an open and transparent way whereby everyone who is eligible to vote is able to.

 

Tracey thanked employees, Councillors, residents, partners and businesses for pulling together over the past 12 months during the pandemic. The Leader thanked Tracey Lee for her incredible leadership during the pandemic for the city of Plymouth.

116.

Leader's Announcements

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Tudor Evans OBE (Leader), highlighted the following in his announcements:

 

(a)

he praised the way the city, its residents and its partners for how it has responded to the pandemic;

 

(b)

Plymouth was to become a Free Port; thanks were offered to Kevin McKenzie and Richard May who were instrumental in leading the bid. The Plymouth and South Devon free zone would create more than 1000 new jobs in the first two years and over 9000 jobs over the next 10 years;

 

(c)

the Council had invested over £9m in acquiring and refurbishing the property for the VOA’s expanding workforce to safeguard and create hundreds of new jobs in the city; James Watt was thanked personally;

 

(d)

two floating pontoons were due to be installed in the sea within the designated swimming area near Tinside pool – they were funded by the Local Enterprise Partnership and would be a welcome addition to the Plymouth Sound National Marine Park;

 

(e)

Plymouth had successfully constructed a new £2.4m commercial employment scheme and secured occupiers for Haxter Court; it would meet the needs of new and expanding businesses within the city;

 

(f)

he ran through a brief presentation upon the work done in 2020/21 which included updates on:

 

 

·        

the Council had big plans for the city in 2020 including Mayflower 400, The Box, £500m worth of development, £250m capital programme, new hotels and £100m of direct developments;

 

 

·        

The Box was opened and was the biggest cultural attraction in the South West;

 

 

·        

Anthony Gormley’s statue Look 2 was installed on the seafront;

 

 

·        

the Barcode started trading in the city in 2020;

 

 

·        

Brewdog would be trading in Plymouth soon;

 

 

·        

First ship launch in Plymouth with the Autonomous ship, was broadcast to 107m people worldwide;

 

 

·        

two new city centre hotels has been secured bringing back two out of use buildings in the city;

 

 

·        

Sail GP was the world’s most exciting yacht race and would be a huge advertisement for the national marine park;

 

 

·        

Phoenix Wharf had been refurbished;

 

 

·        

Launched Smartsound and secured £1.8m in Plymouth Sound;

 

 

·        

submitted a bid to the horizon fund – for £10m to transform the opportunities in the marine park should Plymouth be successful;

 

 

·        

Forder Valley link road was underway and was important to opening up the north of the city for development;

 

 

·        

2021 plans ahead included a £385m city centre investment programme, British Art Show moved to 2022, £500m development pipeline, National Maine Park works, new lighthouse lab developed through the Plymouth Science Park.

 

117.

Cabinet Member Update

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Cabinet Members provided updates as follows:

 

(a)

Councillor Pete Smith (Deputy Leader) made the following announcements:

 

 

 

 

·        

the application for funding to the national leisure recovery fund had been approved – the grant oversight committee agreed to award Plymouth £543,000 of the fund;

 

 

·        

the Life Centre’s gym and new changing rooms would be available from 12 April with the 50m pool and leisure pool opening at the end of April. Other facilities and activities would also begin to re-open in accordance with the Governments roadmap. Work on the diving pool was expected in June;

 

 

·        

other leisure facilities would be open in-line with the Government’s guidance with the athletics track and all weather pitch from 29 March and indoor facilities at Brickfields and Plympton Swimming Pool from 12 April;

 

 

·        

outdoor pools at Tinside and Mount Wise would be open to the public from 1 May, this was a month earlier than usual;

 

 

·        

work had continued to finish the Mayflower 400 capital projects including the heritage trails, and the Elizabethan House; some trails had been completed digitally and were available on the Plymouth Trails App; over 4000 users had registered to date;

 

 

·        

despite Covid 19 the events team worked hard to secure several events: the world’s fastest sailing event, Sail GP was taking place in July and would bring approximately £20m into the economy, over 30,000 took part in virtual VE day celebration and the circus came to central park. The Council was committed to bringing back a full events programme this summer;

 

 

·        

a free to attend live outdoor performance of The Hatchling had been confirmed as part of the Mayflower 400 celebrations whereby a giant puppet of a dragon would roam the streets and take flight;

 

 

·        

Libraries – the council had been awarded funding from reading agency to deliver reading friends – they were linked up with Age UK to deliver this project;

(b)

Councillor Kate Taylor (Cabinet Member for Heath and Adult Social Care), made the following announcements:

 

 

·        

thousands more people had been added to the clinically extremely vulnerable list; the Caring for Plymouth team had contacted all of those people to provide information and support;

 

 

 

·        

there had been a change in care home visiting regulations – residents in care homes were now able to have an additional visitor; this would make a huge difference to residents and their families;

 

 

·        

with regards to care homes in the city – 9 older people care homes, 2 under 65 care homes, 1 supported living setting and 1 extra living facility were coming towards the end of their 28 day outbreak period; the Council would continue to offer support to care providers;

 

 

·        

she offered her thanks and that of Cabinet, to the teams across the city and the council and public health that were working together to keep the city’s most vulnerable people safe;

 

(c)

Councillor Sue Dann (Cabinet Member for Environment and Street Scene) made the following announcements:

 

 

·        

work had started to cleanse the A38 – this was having to be done  at  ...  view the full minutes text for item 117.

118.

Completed Pledges

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Mark Lowry (Cabinet Member for Finance) presented the Completed Pledges to Cabinet -

 

The administration continued with its four year programme to deliver against the 100 pledges, by March 22, for a better, greener and fairer Plymouth. Following the completion of pledges 5, 8 and 48 in February, the total number of pledges completed was 86 of the 100.

 

A pledge on a page had been completed for:

 

a)    Pledge 5: We will continue to invest in science and innovation by supporting the growth of the Plymouth Science Park - the largest in southern England.

 

b)    Pledge 8: To support Plymouth’s ever-growing tourism industry and to capitalise on the legacy of Mayflower 2020, we will attract more high-quality hotels to open in the city.

 

c)    Pledge 48: We will look to provide support for care leavers up to the age of 25, ensuring that the City Council plays its part in supporting young people leaving care, including guaranteeing a work placement with the City Council to help them start their working lives.

 

Cabinet noted the completion of pledges 5, 8 and 48 in February 2021, bringing the total number of completed pledges to 86.

 

119.

Resurgam

Additional documents:

Minutes:

David Draffan (Service Director for Economic Development) gave a presentation on Resurgam –

 

Emergency business support had worked collaboratively with The Chamber, FSB and PMG and provided 11 months of emergency business support. Delivered 13 different grant schemes, distributed £69 million with a further £5 million approved for payment; 12,551 businesses have been supported 

 

Plymouth pioneered automated payments, businesses who had set up initially would get an automated payments as lockdown restrictions continued.   

 

Plymouth has supported many of Plymouths largest employers and undertaken extensive lobbying. There had continued to be concerns about economic long COVID.   

 

Pillars of Resurgam  

 

Building 4 Plymouth, Plymouth had used its Capital programme and the projects delivered to drive local procurement construction jobs. For Oceansgate 91.9% of the spend was within Devon and Cornwall.   

 

Forder Valley Link Road had a total scheme value of £52.8m and would unlock major growth to the north of the city. Local employement for the project was currently 85%; 58% has been spent locally; 77% of the Labour had been sourced within 40 miles; 100% of construction waste had been diverted from landfill.  

 

City Centre Renaissance; £12m had been sourced from the Future High Streets fund for the Civic Centre and Guildhall; initiatives such as Geddon Plymouth and Shop 4 Plymouth; a Reopening campaign for the 12th April; Two City Centre hotels had been completed in lockdown; New retail including Cineworld, Hugo Boss, B&M, German Doner Kebab, Brewdog & more; £30 million health hub at Colin Campbell Court; £50m Barcode development; £80m Brunel Plaza Development; £50m Box development.   

 

Plymouth City Council were spending locally to protect jobs, 60% of Council spend so far this year with local suppliers in PL postcodes, this a 12% increase in 9 months. Suppliers have committed £460,000 of Social value benefits to the City.  

 

Skills 4 Plymouth had been supporting our young people and those that want to reskill, particularly in defence sector as well as Health. 9000 unique users visited the Skills Launch Pad for help, support and guidance; a new start campaign launched with over 90 self referrals in two week; a new physical home for SLP in Barclays Plymouth City Centre would go live post 12th April.  

 

Plymouth had secured a Freeport which would create 9000 jobs over the next 10 years; Oceansgate phase 2 to be completed; Plymouth had launched Ocean Futures to enable partners to focus on Marine Autonomy, digital Ocean technologies and Net Zero Marine; Greener homes and buildings; sustainable transport investments in walking, cycling, hydrogen and fuel generation.   

 

Cabinet noted the upate

120.

Waterfront Business Improvement District (BID) Renewal pdf icon PDF 268 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Pete Smith (Deputy Leader) presented this report to Cabinet -

 

 

·         Summarised the principles and themes of the draft Waterfront BID3 Business Plan 2022-2027

·         Set out Plymouth City Council’s support for the renewal of the Plymouth Waterfront Partnership (PWP) Business Improvement District (BID) for Plymouth’s Waterfront.

·         Defined the Council’s financial and other support for PWP’s Waterfront BID3 (2022-27) as well as a commitment to establish baseline agreements for the Council’s existing services within the BID area.

 

Cabinet agreed to:

1.         Endorse the principles and overall approach of the draft Waterfront Business Plan 2022-2027 as set out in this report.

2.         Note the City Council’s existing and new commitments to secure financial, match and in kind contributions and continued commitment to support the Waterfront BID at existing levels through the proposed BID Contract for the provision of services within the Waterfront Business Improvement District area.

3.         Authorise the Chief Executive to instruct a Ballot Holder to undertake a ballot of appropriate businesses within the Waterfront Business Improvement District area, at the Council’s cost

4.         Delegate to the Strategic Director for Place authority to vote on behalf of the City Council in the Waterfront Business Improvement District ballot.

5.         Delegates to the Strategic Director for Place authority to approve the Waterfront Business District Contract provided that it accords with the general principles set out in this report.

6.         Invite the Brexit, Infrastructure and Legislative Change OSC to consider the Business Improvement District proposals and requests the Committee to insert into their work programme a review of the Business Improvement District proposals and Business Plan with a view to making a recommendation to the City Council regarding exercising its power of veto.

 

 

121.

Culture Plan - a place-based culture strategy for Plymouth 2021-2030 pdf icon PDF 179 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Tudor Evans OBE (Leader) and was supported by Hannah Harris.

 

A place based culture strategy which would takeover from ‘The Vital Spark’ strategy ran until 2020. This new strategy would run from 2021 to 2030.

 

Plymouth City Council had comissioned arts development companies and audience agencies to work with Plymouth which explored data capture to understand the scale and impact of the Sector. Due to the impact of COVID and subsequent lockdown the strategy was paused to reflect on the appropriateness on developing a long term plan, whilst companies and individuals had been in crisis. The feedback however had been to accelerate progress, the positive of the first lockdown had been to allow the team to stop and reflect and plan this strategy thoroughly looking to the future.

 

 

Work had been completed to understand the value of the sector to Plymouth; £34 million spent in Plymouth from visitors; 74% of visitors had been attracted to Plymouth because of its history and heritage; £50 million had been invested in arts and culture in Plymouth in the last five years; £4 million in income has been generated from grass roots music venues; 95 opportunities had been created every week for young people by non-profit cultural organisations in Plymouth; 2,130 jobs had been supported by businesses and organisations in Plymouth; 1 million people go to events organised by creative and cultural organisations in Plymouth every year; 1,200 performance workshops and events had been hosted every year by non-profit cultural organisations in Plymouth; 31,117 musicians played at 2,829 events organised by grass root music venues which were attended by 294,216 people every year.

 

The consultation process had held 40 1:1 stakeholder interviews from the culture sector and beyond in order to have a sense of what Plymouth unique offer is, what the strategy would be and how Plymouth would position itself moving forward.

 

Thematics had been tested within focus group consultation workshops and the vision was refined subsequent to those workshops. A few individual groups were less represented and were engaged with through a number of partner organisations such as Marjons University, Beyond Face, Funky Llama, Plymouth and Devon Freelance Task Force and the Barbican Theatres ReBels young people group.

 

A survey to evaluate the impact of COVID had been undertaken to understand the impact and what Plymouth would be losing from the sector as well as evaluating what Plymouth would gain.

 

The vision for this strategy was to form Plymouth into a magnet city attracting artists, creatives and social activists. Our City’s appeal is characterised by Plymouth’s commitment to people and planet which had been evidenced by the cultural offer it reflects by including and valuing our diverse communities.

 

 

It’s this visions ambition to:

 

(a)

Use Plymouth’s unique landscape to present culture in unusual spaces, to allow people to enjoy Plymouth’s unique assets making use of the waterfront, green spaces and urban environment.

 

(b)

For culture to be for everyone every day and to be visible and accessible

 

(c)

Build a co-creation  ...  view the full minutes text for item 121.

122.

iMayflower

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Tracy Beeck Project Manager presented the iMayflower item to Cabinet -

 

IMayflower was a project aimed at delivering economic growth whilst celebrating and highlighting Plymouth’s cultural assets in order to showcase Plymouth as a place to live, visit, work and study. iMayflower supports businesses to start up scale up, find funding and use world class facilities.

 

The focus of the project was on immersive technology and digital fabrication which was supported by key assets such as The Dome, Plymouth College of Art and the immersive digital and tech labs at Plymouth University. 

 

The contract for this project started in April 2019 and had been due to conclude in 2022. Funding for the project had been made available from the Department for Culture Media and Sport. Plymouth was funded £3.5 million from the Cultural Development Fund.

 

Project strands have included Illuminate. iMayflower links into various large scale cultural events which inspires and enriches the city.

 

Start-up weekends sponsored by Google has encouraged entrepreneurship. The mentorship will lead to a combination of activities which will lead in creating new industry start-ups and create growth in existing companies. The overall aim is the creation of high quality sustainable growth in a high growth industry and to develop exciting new intellectual property to enhance reputation.  

 

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport had provided additional funding which would extend the project by 6 months to September 2022.

 

Cabinet noted the report.

 

123.

Future High Street Fund pdf icon PDF 184 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Mark Lowry (Cabinet Member for Finance) introduced the Future High Street Fund item –

 

Plymouth had been given a decision in principle from the Future High Street Fund of £12 million which is expected to be received at the end of March. The project would include new events facilities, a creative hub, commercial space and 144 new apartments.

 

The Guildhall would be allocated £4 million to update and modernise the building to allow Plymouth to host more events with much improved facilities; significant investments would be allocated in the historic civic square.

 

This investment is likely to create a large footfall for the city and aimed to create 46,000 extra visitors and 25,000 hotel nights; bringing in £5 million a year; 300 permanent jobs and the creation of 300 construction jobs.

 

The Civic Centre would have 144 homes; the north block and basement would be converted to provide conferences; first floor would be allocated for smaller meeting and break out rooms and the ground floor would be allocated for larger conference rooms; the basement would become a large auditorium seating 600-800 delegates of different functions; the south block would have a range of commercial space which would work well alongside the conference offer including office space, leisure and restaurant usage.

 

The Guildhall would have a range of improvements in order to make the facility more accessible. The building will be modernised to provide high quality facilities on offer to residents and people using the facilities. Improvement include:

 

·          

Improving the main entrance

·          

Refurbishing the existing lifts

·          

Making the reception area more welcoming and to have a more usable space

·          

Improving access, the lighting and sound system, improving the toilets and bar area  to the Drake room 

·          

Improving the lighting, sound systems, seating, staging and installing a new commercial kitchen to the Great Hall and first floor.

·          

Second floor improvements to meeting rooms and office space

 

The Civic Square was still in the design process, but Plymouth City Council recognise it as a fundamental part in the High Street Fund Scheme as it provided a link between the two buildings and would provide a setting for City Centre functions and events. It was recognised that many of the original features had become warn and alterations had been made.

 

Further consultation with the general public would take place regarding the square and further planning applications will be submitted in relation to the conference and events facilities as well as the lower parts of the Civic Tower and basement.

 

It was noted that work on the redevelopments would start in 2022 with the Guildhall having a completion date of 2023 and the tower of 2024.

 

Cabinet members agreed -

 

·          

The virement from Civic Centre to the Guildhall of £2.45m funding previously allocated within the Capital Programme.

·          

To accept grant funding of £12,046,873 that is expected to be awarded by the Future High Streets Fund.

·          

To allocate an additional £12,046,873 for the projects to the Capital Programme, if the funding was received from the  ...  view the full minutes text for item 123.

124.

Brexit Scrutiny (Fishing) Recommendations

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Darren Winter and Kevin McKenzie (Policy and Intelligence Advisor) presented this item.

 

Councillor Winter presented a video with extracts from fishermen sharing their concerns around the UK’s exit from the EU and Customs Union and how there had been gaps in the government’s strategy which had impacted fishermen and exporters. 

 

Concerns included:

·          

There would be a 5% difference in exporting to the continent, however it was proposed that there would be a quota improvement to offset this difference, this hasn’t materialised and the government has traded this away.

·          

The Norwegian style deal doesn’t allow EU vessels in their waters until quota shares had been organised. The UK no longer had that leverage. 

·          

Supermarkets were not supporting British fishermen and weren’t pushing British produce.

·          

We need a smooth throughput, currently there was an additional 1000 miles to the Journey to get product to market.

·          

There had been extra costs to exporters such as additional container rentals; additional mileage; additional driver hours; re-arranging logistics; additional veterinary costs; additional admin and operational costs; loss of sales; additional costs in freezing fish; loss of cells. The seafood disruption support scheme requires an invoice to be raised to claim funds.

 

Cabinet members agreed unanimously to call on the government to recognise: -

 

That the Trade and Cooperation agreement fails to deliver on the promises that were made to British fishermen, and, that insufficient effort was made by ministers to prepare for foreseeable problems that would accompany the UK’s departure from the single market and customs union at the end of the Brexit transition period. 

 

Government is asked to: -

 

A/

UK territorial waters

·          

Consider regulatory measures based on scientific evidence that will help protect the interests of the UK inshore fleet.

·          

Continue to seek a fairer share of the quota in the western channel for Cod, Haddock and Sole that are important to the South West fleet.

B/

 

·          

Extend the scope and duration of the compensation scheme to fully cover the cost of the additional burdens placed on the fishing industry until at least 1st April 2022;

·          

Lead on the integration and digitalisation of regulatory data systems so that data can be shared electronically with industry to support exports; and

·          

Negotiate facilitation measures based on common or equivalent animal health and food safety standards to reduce the frequency of physical checks and extend the use of electronic certification.

 

C/

Support local fishing communities 

·          

Utilise the crown procurement service and public sector purchasing power to stimulate the domestic market for seafood and support schemes to get fresh locally caught fish to consumers; 

·          

Ensure the voice of coastal communities with a stake in the industry is heard by giving local authorities a statutory role in developing fisheries management plans; and,

·          

Invest in the workforce of the future by establishing suitable apprenticeship schemes; and,

·          

Provide funds to upgrade the infrastructure the industry depends on, the quays and auctions, whether they are in private or public ownership.

 

That Cabinet agreed to:

 

D/

Measures we can promote as a  ...  view the full minutes text for item 124.

125.

Brexit (Border Issues)

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Kevin McKenzie, Policy and Intelligence Advisor presented this item to Cabinet -

 

·         Cabinet had been provided with regular updates about our state of Brexit preparedness. These reports have had a specific focus on the potential impacts that could arise at our port, not only because we are the Port Health Authority but also because of the importance of the Plymouth to Roscoff trade route to the sub regional economy.

 

·         Following the end of the Brexit transition period the UK Border Operating Model came into force on the 1st January 2021. The impact on us as a Port Health Authority has to date been minimal due to early decision of Brittany Ferries to suspend the ferry service. There had however been significant economic disruption across a number of industrial sectors. 

 

·         The government had suggested that this disruption could be characterised as teething problems as industry comes to terms with our new trading relationship with the EU. The reality was that many of the problems were in fact a direct consequence of us leaving the Single Market and Customs Union, which not only could have been foreseen but which were specifically drawn to the attention of ministers by the Leader of the Council.

 

·         In December 2020 we reported to Cabinet that our survey of local business readiness revealed that 20% of respondents exported to the EU and that whilst 75% understood that the Border Operating Model would affect their trade with the EU only 8% felt well prepared for the end of the transition period. Through the Chamber of Commerce we were also aware that there was a feeling that many companies did not appreciate that these changes would be implemented whether or not we secured a trade agreement with the EU.

 

·         The impact of the changes on sectors like the shell fishing industry has been well documented and the Government have suggested that this is the result of a change of policy by the EU. In fact the Government was aware that the rules would apply permanently once the transition period ended and the Secretary of State acknowledged that fact in a letter sent on 10 December 2020. It is less well known that these rules also affect other products of animal origin used in food manufacture.

 

Cabinet agreed to -

·          

Work closely with Associated British Ports with the aim of Plymouth being among the first local authorities to host a designated Border Control Post.

·          

Work on the South West logistic hub and consider the potential for it to be aligned to our Freeport.

 

126.

Family Hubs pdf icon PDF 167 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Jemima Laing (Cabinet Member for Children and Young People) and Emma Crowther (Strategic Commissioning Manager) introduced the report on Family Hubs to Cabinet -

 

The case for change described our overarching ambition and plan to transform the Early Help and Targeted Support offer for a generation of children, young people and families in Plymouth, to give our children the best possible start in life.

 

This would build on areas of integrated working which were already taking shape to better support families, including co-commissioned approaches to Community Health, Wellbeing and SEND and embedding community maternity services into Children’s Centres.

 

The paper recommends a course of action to create 0-19 Family Hubs and drive forward the work to transform the Early Help system in Plymouth. The report was fully informed by feedback obtained through consultation with young people, families and practitioners across Plymouth. This told us that the current system was fragmented and difficult to navigate for families and practitioners, and does not maximise opportunities to help families earlier.

           

This Proposal would allow Plymouth to work together in a joined up system, it proposed an innovative partnership to bring all Local Authority and commissioned resources together to design the future with our local partners. It would give freedom over the next 10 years to innovate and to take a leap of faith on some projects and really embed change with children young people and families which is at the heart of everything that we have done.  

 

Advised that Plymouth was  proposing a different way of organising a very diverse group of services that offer support to families in need. Plymouth City Council’s in-house and commissioned services represents £7.5 million a year in the city. Plymouth had chosen the innovative partnership model as it allowed Plymouth to work in a creative way with partners to build on the positives going on in the city, but also critically to design services for the future. This proposal would allow Plymouth to solve issues together and create new ideas.  

 

Cabinet agreed to -

 

1.    Approve the direction of travel of the Case for Change

2.    Approve the use of an Innovative Partnership procurement procedure to select a partner or partners to work with Plymouth City Council to transform Early Help in the city through the creation of 0-19 Family Hubs;

3.    Delegate authority to the Strategic Director for People and the Director of Children’s Services to award a ten year collaborative contract (“Early Help Innovative Partnership”) to the successful tenderer.

 

127.

Community Empowerment Programme: Working together for a Fairer, Greener, Healthier Plymouth

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Chris Penberthy (Cabinet Member for Housing and Co-operative Development) introduced the Community Empowerment item –

 

Community Empowerment refered to the process of enabling communities to increase control over their lives. Plymouth City Council was committed to supporting local communities to do things for themselves, and to make their voices heard in shaping the services they use and the places they live.

 

The next phase of the Community Empowerment Programme was to build on the success it had already implemented to lead a strategic Council wide approach to empower residents and businesses. The five themes were; Community engagement, building resilient communities, supporting and developing the voluntary community sector, Co-operatives and social enterprises, helping people to do their bit to volunteer and the culture change in leadership to underpin this to enable it to happen.

 

All of this has been supported by a detailed action plan, delivered by resources already in the City. Making it clear to officers, partners and communities in detailing how the council will engage.

 

Cabinet agreed to -

 

1.     

Endorse the Council’s renewed approach to engagement and the principles that will be set out within it.

2.     

Approve the Community Empowerment Action Plan 2021.